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Birth Rates and Environmental Estrogen

Birth Rates and Environmental Estrogen

Posted by Ryan Wade on 8th Apr 2012

Birth Rates and Environmental Estrogen

Birth Rates and Environmental Estrogen

One of the main contributors to the estrogen toxicity epidemic facing both men and women in the modern world are environmental and industrial chemicals. We mostly think of these in terms of agricultural products, but in actuality many industrial chemicals are actually xeno-estrogen, which wreak havoc on our bodies (as well as the bodies of all living things).

I just came across an interesting study which exemplifies how powerful these industrial pollutants turned endocrine toxins are. According to a major research study, men who working in agriculture, or had similar agriculture exposure, had daughters at a rate of 83.4%. The normal rate for a daughter to be born is 48%.

Since we know that all fetuses are, by default, female sex, and it is the introduction of testosterone which brings about the development of the XY chromosome arrangement, we can see how a body highly polluted with xeno-estrogen would cause female babies to be born at a higher than normal rate.